“The world of “Game of Thrones” is now populated by two kinds of women: those who are actualized to make their own destinies, like Ygritte, Daenerys, Melisandre, Arya, and those who still rely on their male counterparts to dictate their happiness (with characters like Brienne caught somewhere in the middle). While the women deprived of power choose to self-medicate—Cersei drinks herself into a stupor in the castle, Sansa starves, Shae seduces, and Margaery touches diamonds—Arya’s drug of choice is grisly revenge. As she rides off into the sunset on a white horse, she looks less like a princess on a pony and more like a knight coming to her own rescue.”
— From A New Kind of Woman on “Game of Thrones”? in the New Yorker by Rachel Syme.
tedx:

All too familiar with all the things he had done or not done in his life, novelist Keiichiro Hirano had trouble accepting himself as a “good” or a “bad” person, until he realized that maybe he was a bit more complicated than that.
Above, moments from his beautiful TEDxKyoto talk, “Love others to love yourself.” (In Japanese with English subtitles)Watch the whole talk here»
tedx:

All too familiar with all the things he had done or not done in his life, novelist Keiichiro Hirano had trouble accepting himself as a “good” or a “bad” person, until he realized that maybe he was a bit more complicated than that.
Above, moments from his beautiful TEDxKyoto talk, “Love others to love yourself.” (In Japanese with English subtitles)Watch the whole talk here»
tedx:

All too familiar with all the things he had done or not done in his life, novelist Keiichiro Hirano had trouble accepting himself as a “good” or a “bad” person, until he realized that maybe he was a bit more complicated than that.
Above, moments from his beautiful TEDxKyoto talk, “Love others to love yourself.” (In Japanese with English subtitles)Watch the whole talk here»
tedx:

All too familiar with all the things he had done or not done in his life, novelist Keiichiro Hirano had trouble accepting himself as a “good” or a “bad” person, until he realized that maybe he was a bit more complicated than that.
Above, moments from his beautiful TEDxKyoto talk, “Love others to love yourself.” (In Japanese with English subtitles)Watch the whole talk here»
tedx:

All too familiar with all the things he had done or not done in his life, novelist Keiichiro Hirano had trouble accepting himself as a “good” or a “bad” person, until he realized that maybe he was a bit more complicated than that.
Above, moments from his beautiful TEDxKyoto talk, “Love others to love yourself.” (In Japanese with English subtitles)Watch the whole talk here»

tedx:

All too familiar with all the things he had done or not done in his life, novelist Keiichiro Hirano had trouble accepting himself as a “good” or a “bad” person, until he realized that maybe he was a bit more complicated than that.

Above, moments from his beautiful TEDxKyoto talk, “Love others to love yourself.” (In Japanese with English subtitles)

Watch the whole talk here»

“Respect ought to mean you can set aside the roles you play every day and indulge in perverse, silly, exciting, transgressive consensual acts, whatever they may be. Anyone who finds that dampening to the sexual spirit doesn’t sound quite ready for equality. So next time you read a little stat like, “The risk of divorce is lowest when the husband does 40 percent of the housework and the wife earns 40 percent of the income,” you shouldn’t think, wow, equality is really killing my boner. You should think, wow, we’ve still got a long way to go.”
— From What if Equality is the Biggest Boner Killer of All? by Tracy Moore of Jezebel. In response to the stupid Does a More Equal Marriage Mean Less Sex? by Lori Gottlieb, who wrote this book btw Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough.
“We don’t make cities in order to make buildings and infrastructure. We make cities in order to come together, to create wealth, culture, more people.”

There’s been a flood of handwringing op-eds lately about how glassy-eyed mobile-phone zombies are ignoring each other at the restaurant instead of talking to another another. I think these pundits are somewhat overblowing the frequency of this behavior, frankly. Very similar alarms were raised about the wave of supposedly society-ending isolation that would wreaked by previous newfangled media — like the telephone in the late 19th century, and the Walkman in the 80s. We didn’t suffer a social apocalypse then, and I don’t think we’re going to suffer one now.

That said, I actually think the op-ed handwringing is useful in its own way. It’s part of how a society creates social codes around new technologies. When mobile phones inched into the mainstream in the 90s, people who bought them used to answer them, every single time they rang, whenever and wherever they rang: At the dinner table, at the funeral, while having sex. It took about a decade of this behavior peaking before society collectively began to realize this was kind of terrible behavior, and we starting poking fun at it — you saw lots of jokes about it, like that “inconsiderate cell phone man” ad that used to run before movies. And eventually we moved away from the behavior. We’re probably in the middle of this curve with social media.

In this fantastic interview, Clive Thompson offers a refreshingly lucid antidote to all the techno-dystopia about how the age of connectivity is killing our offline lives. Thompson is the author of Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better, one of the best science and technology books of the year

(via The Dish)

(via explore-blog)

Reza Mafi

Reza Mafi

asiasociety:

A behind the scenes look as Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at Asia Society Museum, Michelle Yun directs the set up of Mohsen Vaziri-Moqaddam’s Untitled sculpture for the Iran Modern exhibition: http://scty.asia/1aZCfgt

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“We read stories in the press all the time about Steve Jobs and how brilliant he was, but you very rarely hear questions about whether he was a good father or a good husband. You hear comparisons of Lloyd Blankfein and Jamie Dimon in the financial sector, but no one ever asks questions about their fatherhood, their manhood, their hobbies, even. You never hear anyone say to Bill Gates or Bill Clinton, “Do you have it all?” I think because the opportunities to women are so new, in historical terms, that somehow we’ve created these unfair expectations for women.”
— Debora Spar, from her interview in NYMag
“Just how often do we cripple ourselves by not letting love with all its risks teach us how to fly? How many times do our hearts stall because we won’t let the wingspan of our passion open us fully into our gifts? How frequently do we search for a song of guidance that can only come from inside us?”
— Mark Nepo